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Cardiothoracic Surgeons

J. Robert Headrick, M.D.

Dr. Headrick attended medical school at the University of Tennessee College of Medicine in Memphis, Tennessee. He completed and internship and residency at the University of Tennessee, Chattanooga, before completing a thoracic and cardiovascular surgery residency at the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine. He is board certified by the American Board of Surgery and the American Board of Thoracic Surgery.

“One major advance in the treatment of lung cancer is the ability to operate on the lung and remove tumors through tiny holes in the chest. This required specialized training for both surgeons and other members of the surgical team. It also meant that CHI Memorial invested heavily in high definition cameras, scopes, robotic devices and an operating room design that contributes to the minimally invasive treatment of lung cancer,” says Dr. Headrick. “No other hospital has this level of capabilities or commitment to an advanced lung program like CHI Memorial.” 

Traditional open surgery generally requires an incision large enough to give the surgeon physical access to the tumor. But technologies like video-assisted thoracic surgery that allows the surgeon to see inside the chest with a miniature camera, and robotic surgery that gives better access to the chest cavity and improved ability to remove lymph nodes as part of a cancer operation, are making traditional surgery less necessary. Whenever possible, minimally invasive techniques are used, resulting in less pain.

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Wilson Monroe Clements, M.D.

Dr. Clements attended medical school at the University of Tennessee College of Medicine in Memphis, Tennessee. He completed a residency in general surgery at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center and a residency in thoracic surgery at Medical University of South Carolina. He completed a fellowship in minimally invasive and robotic cardiac surgery at East Carolina University.  Dr. Clements is board certified by the American Board of Surgery and the American Board of Thoracic Surgery. 

“The da Vinci’s endowrist functions like a human wrist, allowing us to make very fine maneuvers on delicate tissue. We can work inside the heart with great detail while repairing the diseased or damaged valve with great precision,” says Dr. Clements. “Greater precision means less pain, and people can return to work and play faster with these minimally invasive techniques.”

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